This Week in Time Capsules: We're Gonna Need A Bigger CapsuleS

This week's top time capsule stories from around the world include an abundance of riches in Florida, a surprise capsule found by some rather patient people Down Under, and the old question of tech obsolescence at a school in California.

Florida County Gets So Many Donations They Have To Buy A Second Capsule

Sarasota County, Florida recently asked its residents to contribute items for a new time capsule. And believe it or not, the county had to buy a second capsule just to handle all the stuff that was donated!

The capsules were buried in Spanish Point Park, in the town of Osprey where they'll rest until the year 2071. That is, provided nobody regrets their donation to the time capsules and tried to go dig them up. [Herald-Tribune]

1985 Capsule Recently Discovered Will Be Reburied Until 2035

A 1985 time capsule in Australia was recently discovered at a former elementary school. But amazingly, if you want to know what's in it you're going to have to wait until 2035. Showing a kind of restraint incredibly rare for the human species, the mayor of Banyule has decided that it won't be opened prematurely. Nobody knows what's inside, but if you have any more information about the capsule, the school would love to hear from you. [Herald Sun]

California School Buries Time Capsule With 2013 Technology

A junior high school in Chino, California recently buried a time capsule that yet again raises questions about tech obsolescence. With the proper protection, most of the capsule's contents — like photos of the last 16 principals of the school, and a 2013 penny — will make it safely into the future. But the flash drive and cellphone? They'll almost certainly be a challenge for the people of tomorrow to unlock. [Daily Bulletin]


Photo: Sarasota County time capsule by Shelby Webb for the Herald-Tribune